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Posts Tagged ‘Cantaloupe’

Sweet, short, ABUNDANT Thanksgiving! A Horn-of-Plenty, a Cornucopia!

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New this week: ‘Franz’ or Ciboule Onions. 2 farm children picked out allium (onion) seeds from seed catalogues, planted them, weeded them, mulched them, watered them, harvested them. They had one 18 x 4 ft bed for their alliums. After harvesting our family’s yearly onion need they still had one row left in the bed of a new, experimental heirloom, perennial allium. These can be replanted if you want your own perennial (year-round) crop! They over-winter and start multiplying in early Spring. The young greens can be harvested from April to May for an early veggie/herb. They resemble leeks and scallions, the whole stem is edible. We bought them from Heritage Harvest Seeds. Ciboule onions are prized in France and Asia!

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They may look leek-like like this or …

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… or scallion-like like this

Farm pick list: These items are only available at our farm market Saturday October 8th 8 am – 2 pm. 2 types of Mushrooms, Tomatoes (in October, what!?), Beets from Brandner Farms,  Red + Yellow Potatoes and Carrots from Pfenning’s Organic Farm, Watermelon + Cantaloupes, Winter Squash, Sweet Peppers, Scallions, Beans, Broccoli, Kale + Chard, Salad Mix, a large variety of fresh herbs, and our new ciboule Onions!

Anticipated Windsor pick list for Wednesday October 12th: Cherry Tomatoes, Kale + Chard, Salad Mix, new ciboule onions, scallions, Winter Squash, Sweet Peppers, a variety of fresh herbs.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING EVERYONE!

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VEGGIE OF THE WEEK IS CHERRY TOMATOES

There is a reason we call them ‘candy’, this is nature’s finest candy. We select the most delicious heirlooms varieties, mixing up the colours, the flavours, and the shapes to make eye-engaging and taste-bud pleasing treats. Did you know that botanically speaking tomatoes are berries? It’s true! Check out the definition of Berry from Wikipedia. Cherry tomatoes are perfect for turning into sundried tomatoes treats as well – 2 boxes fill 1 tray so 8 boxes fill a standard dehydrator. These sweeties will blow you away with how much sweeter they are than grocery store fare. Lucky for you they are at their peak right now – peak sweetness and peak production – so we’ve been selling them at a discount. We’ll have small amounts of sundried tomatoes for sampling so you can see just how easy and tasty it is to turn the cherries into dried snacks. One slice and they’re ready!

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There are new links up on the Veggies! page for new ways to use tomatoes including drink ideas and how to use over-ripe tomatoes. This page also has links to the varieties we’re growing, check it out as some of them have lovely historical stories behind them. We’ll tell you all about them at our Heirloom Tomato Taste-Test Fest on Saturday September 3rd!

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Eat The Rainbow?

A lovely farm friend said this week that when they go to the grocery store that it seems “wrong” and “weird” to see only red or only yellow or only orange tomatoes for sale. We agree, our colourful mixes are the only way to go, especially when you want to Eat The Rainbow.

Are you still looking to can tomatoes? We’ve got some extra hampers for sale for this Saturday – tomorrow! – August 27th, swing by the farm during our market hours of 8 am to 2 pm.

We’ll be joined by Another Way for a special Crystal event tomorrow too!

And we’ll also be joined by Neo-Vintage Artistry ~ one of a kind, hand-crafted jewelry!

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While we love the flavours of Summer finally ripening it’s also been challenging as a few of us have severe allergies and growing organically means weeds, like ragweed, and it’s doing a number not just on our sinuses but harvesting leaves us with prickly rashes, which means we have to have several cold showers with the hose to get the yuckies off (we’re even allergic to tomato plants!) …

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With some of the harvest.

“Why did the tomato blush? Because it saw the salad dressing.”

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We gave away all of our melon harvest this past week. It was quite sad to see all the plants dead but we were happy to hear that most of the melons were ripe, sweet, and delicious. And since we can’t have melons as veggie of the week here are the jokes we’ve been saving …

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Another surprise this week was Spaghetti Squash and Delicata and Sweet Dumplings. These are not long-term storage squash but they will last up to a month in dry, cool conditions. They have thin rinds and you can eat the rind of the Delicata and Sweet Dumplings. They are great for stuffing. More recipes on the Veggies! page. These will be available until they’re all gone. We also harvested most of our long-term storage squash and they’re currently curing. More on those later but for now a sneak peek ….

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With many thanks to Joce, Nat, Lennon, Faenin, and Oddy for pulling in this harvest!

Before we get to the pick list, we came across a wonderful article on being part of a CSA and ideas for Hearty Vegetarian Dinner from the Kitchn.

Veggies available this week: Cherry Tomatoes, Tomatoes for Canning, Snap Beans, Sweet Peppers (still producing prolifically!), Scallions, Kale + Chard, Succulent Salad Mix, Fennel (bulbs and in salad mixes), Fresh Herbs, Dried Herbs, Squash (mostly Spaghetti), Eggplant + Patty Pans, Garlic, and very HOT hot Peppers.

 

 

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VEGGIE OF THE WEEK IS PEPPERS

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Sweet peppers, lunchbox peppers, bell peppers, Italian frying peppers, hot peppers – so many PEPPERS to choose from!

We started growing lunchbox peppers in 2014 and the first time we harvested them we thought, “I don’t think this is worth it, they’re so small and it’s back-breaking to pick them.”. But then we tasted them … and we were hooked. We pack them for customers in half pound bags but we take home 2 pounds a day and eat them in a sitting. As I sit and write this I’m snacking on these sweet treats. They are a dream to grow but even better to eat. With few seeds, all near the stem, you can eat the little red ones in one bite, leaving only the stem, making these a perfect snack for busy families. This variety doesn’t have the problems that bell peppers do so they’re also our most productive pepper. For a list of all the peppers we’re growing check out the VEGGIES! page.

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Not to be confused with HOT PEPPERS. Lunchbox Peppers and some of our Bell Pepper varieties look like hot peppers but we’re very careful to grow them far away from each other, to pick them at different times, and to carefully label them. We would never want someone to take a big bite out of pepper and find out it’s HOT. But we are growing hot peppers, and this year, with all the heat and drought, they are really hot. If you are a hot pepper connoisseur these are the peppers for you. Carefully selected and harvested by our farm children, who are hot pepper connoisseurs, these freeze well and make superb hot sauce.

“What do you get if you cross a chili pepper, a shovel, and a terrier?

A hot-diggity-dog!”

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Hot, hot, hot.

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With all the rain we got on Saturday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, our Tomatoes exploded, literally. They didn’t know what to do with all the water (having acclimatized themselves to a slow irrigation drip) – and they split, cracked, exploded all over. We’ve worked at removing all the tomatoes so that new ones can come in all sweet and shiny.

Which is a good segue into imperfect produce …. We’ve all been accustomed to “perfect” vegetables that are sold in grocery stores. What most of us don’t know is that in order to get those “perfect” veggies a farmer must not only use unsustainable, polluting, and harmful methods, they must also plant 3 to 4 times more of a particular crop, which means 3/4 of a crop goes to waste. We cannot farm in this way, it goes against all we are and how we live. Our chickens and our composters don’t want or need that much food.  So yes, our produce is often imperfect, it looks the way it would if you grew it yourself. But it’s healthy and fresh, it’s good for your body and good for the environment. Imperfect produce is a trend, google it!

Before we get to the vegetable selection for the week (ignoring the BIG name we gave this blog post 😉 ) we want to thank our dear, dear farm friends who’ve stepped up to help us this week. It’s been hot, the work has been hard, it’s rained hard on us, we’ve worked long, long hours, but in the end everything gets done. Young and old, new and familiar, have all helped out this week. We had a lovely visit from a member and their little one who came to pick their own basket of tomatoes for turning into sauce and salsa. So many lovely visitors this week. Thank you all 🙂

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This week our salad mix contains some borage leaves. They feel a bit prickly on the lips but once you chew them they’re like a refreshing cucumber and the prickliness becomes but a memory.

We have cherry tomatoes, a variety of other tomatoes, beans, eggplant, gorgeous scallions (try dehydrating them for a surprising snack!), garlic, and some surprises.

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Mint drying to make mint tea.

On Saturday August 27th we welcome back Jackie from Another Way to our farm market, this time to talk about Crystals! Facebook event can be found at this link.

From 8:00 AM until 2:00 PM, Jackie will be available to answer your question as it relates to crystals. She can share which crystal would be best suited for you or how to use crystals. You could ask which crystal would be the best to use for a specific condition; how to use your crystal; what to use your crystal for. Using Hibiscus Moon Training and intuition to answer your crystal questions. Crystals will also be available for sale.

Until next week!

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Photo by Andrea Nickerson. Mark your calendars for Saturday September 3rd for our Heirloom Tomato Taste-Test Fest!

 

 

 

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We got a big job done this week – harvesting and hanging up the Garlic – and we’ve begun grading it for seed, sale, and personal use (basically what we can’t sell because it’s damaged or too small).

Garlic Hanging in the Hoophouse alongside Pepper Plants

Garlic Hanging in the Hoophouse alongside Pepper Plants

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This week’s pick list includes:

* Melons – Cantaloupes, Honey Dew, Watermelon

'Arava' Cantaloupe

Arava Cantaloupe

Golden Watermelon, an early variety, seed from High Mowing

Golden Watermelon, an early variety, seed from High Mowing

Even the leaves of the Golden Watermelon are Golden!

Even the leaves of the Golden Watermelon are Golden!

Baby Watermelon, an early variety grown from seed we saved last year

Baby Watermelon, an early variety grown from seed we saved last year

* A variety of Cherry Tomatoes – Black Cherry, Violet, Isis Candy, Yellow Pear, Peardrop, White, Sweet Millions, Indigo Rose

* A variety of Slicing and Beefsteak Tomatoes (some are unknown) – Japanese Trifele, Bellstar, Black Cherokee, Watermelon Beefsteak, Eva Purple Ball, Calabash, Copia, White, Taxi, Black Plum, Oregon Spring

* A hand-picked variety of Snap Beans

* Cucumbers and Eggplant – Listada di Gandia, Rosa Bianca, Black Beauty, Traviata, Little Finger, Calliope, Kermit, Orient Charm, Orient Express

* Salanova Lettuce – We experimented with all the available varieties and are extremely satisfied with how they turned out and will definitely grow them again. They withstood the heat of summer beautifully, they are beautiful, and save an incredible amount of time.

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The busyness of full-time farming and full-time parenting got the best of us this summer and we didn’t publish our weekly baskets on the blog. Winter is when we play catch-up with everything we had to put on hold to grow food for our CSA members and our local community.

Here’s what our members saw in their weekly baskets (we’re publishing this so that future, prospective members can see what the produce provided in previous years) :

Week 5 –

Large baskets contained 1 pound of Beans*, a bunch of Chard, 1 Armenian Cucumber, 1 head of Garlic, 1 head of Lettuce, 1 pound of Salad Mix, a bunch of Spring Onions, a bunch of Parsley, Okra, hot Peppers, a bunch of Rapini, a bunch of Turnips, and Summer Squash.

Small baskets contained 1 pound of Beans, a bunch of Chard, 1 Armenian Cucumber, 1 head of Garlic, a bunch of Spring Onions, Okra, hot Peppers, a bunch of Rapini, and a bunch of Turnips.

Week 6 –

Large baskets contained Basil, 1 pound Beans, 1 Broccoli, 1 Green Cabbage, 1 Armenian Cucumber, a bunch of Kale, 1 head of Lettuce, Okra, hot Peppers, 1 quart of Cherry Tomatoes, and a bunch of Turnips.

Small baskets contained 1 pound of Beans, 1 Armenian Cucumber, a bunch of Kale, 1 head of Lettuce, Okra, hot Peppers, 1 quart of Cherry Tomatoes, and a Summer Squash.

Week 7 – This is where the contents between the farm pickup baskets and the market baskets varied, not in price, but in produce. If one group didn’t get an item one week then they got it the next.

Large baskets contained a bunch of Basil, 1 pound of Beans, 1 pound of Salad mix, Okra, hot Peppers, Winter Squash, Summer Squash, 1 quart of Cherry Tomatoes, Summer Squash, and some combination of Napa Cabbage, a bunch of Carrots, an Armenian Cucumber, sweet green Peppers, or a quart of new Potatoes.

Small baskets contained a bunch of Basil, 1 pound of Beans, 1 Red Cabbage, Okra, 1 Winter Squash, a quart of Cherry Tomatoes, and some combination of Napa Cabbage, 1 Armenian Cucumbers, a bunch of Carrots, Salad mix, sweet green Peppers, 1 quart of new Potatoes, or a Summer Squash.

Week 8 –

Large baskets contained a bunch of Basil, 1 pound of Beans, a bunch of Beets, 1 head of Broccoli, 1 pound of Salad mix, 1 sweet green Pepper, a bunch of Radishes, 1 quart Cherry Tomatoes, and a combination of  a bunch of Chard, 1 Eggplant, a bunch of Kale, or a quart of new Potatoes.

Small baskets contained a bunch of Basil, 1 pound of Beans, a bunch of Beets, 1 sweet green Pepper, 1 quart of Cherry Tomatoes, and a combination of a bunch of Chard, a bunch of Kale, Salad mix, 1 quart of new Potatoes, or a bunch of Radishes.

Week 9 –

Large baskets contained 1 pound of Beans, 1 Savoy Cabbage, 1 large Eggplant, 1 pound of Salad mix, Okra, hot Peppers, 2 sweet green Peppers, a bunch of Radishes, 6 pounds of heirloom Tomatoes, 2 pounds of Cherry Tomatoes and a combination of a bunch of Kale, Summer Squash, or Armenian Cucumbers.

Small baskets contained 1 Savoy Cabbage, Okra, hot Peppers, 1 sweet green Pepper, 4 pounds of heirloom Tomatoes, 1 pound of Cherry Tomatoes and a combination of Beans, Armenian Cucumber, Eggplant, or a bunch of Kale.

Week 10 –

Large baskets contained 2 large Eggplant, 2 heads of Garlic, a bunch of Spring Onions, 4 sweet green Peppers, 2 pounds of heirloom Tomatoes and a combination of a bunch of Basil, Beans, a bunch of Kale, a bunch of Radishes, 1 “surprise variety” Watermelon, or Cherry Tomatoes.

Small baskets contained a bunch of Basil, 1 pound of Beans, a bunch of Carrots, Armenian Cucumber, 1 Eggplant, 1/2 pound of Salad mix, Okra, Summer Squash, 1 pound of Cherry Tomatoes.

Week 11 –

Large baskets contained a bunch of Basil, 1 head of Garlic, 1 pound of Onions, 2 sweet green Peppers, a bunch of Radishes, 1 pound of heirloom Tomatoes and a combination of Beans, a head of red Cabbage, a bunch of Carrots, a head of Cauliflower, a bunch of Chard, a bunch of Kale or Collards, Spring Onions, Okra, 1 pound of new Potatoes,1 pound of Cherry Tomatoes, a bunch of Turnips, or a 1 “surprise variety” Watermelon.

Small baskets contained 1 sweet green Pepper, a bunch of Radishes, 1 “surprise variety” Watermelon, and a combination of Beans, red Cabbage, a bunch of Carrots, a head of Cauliflower, a bunch of Chard, 1 Eggplant, 1 head of Garlic, a bunch of Kale or Collards, Spring Onion, heirloom Tomatoes, or a bunch of Turnips.

Week 12 –

Large baskets contained 2 Eggplant, 2 heads of Garlic, a bunch of Kale, 1/2 pound of Salad mix, 1 pack of Mushrooms**, 1 Melon (either Honeydew or Cantaloupe), 2 pounds of Onions, Okra, 1 sweet green Pepper, hot Peppers, 3 pounds of heirloom Tomatoes, and a combination of  a head of Broccoli, a bunch of Carrots, a head of Cauliflower, a bunch of Parsley, or a bunch of Turnips.

Small baskets contained 1 Eggplant, 1 pack of Mushrooms**, 1 Melon (either Honeydew or Cantaloupe), 1 pound of Onions, 1 sweet green Pepper, 2 pounds of  heirloom Tomatoes, a bunch of Turnips, and a combination of  a bunch Carrots, a head of Cauliflower, a head of Garlic, a bunch of Kale, or a bunch of Parsley.

Week 13 –

Large baskets contained a bunch of Basil, 1 head of Cauliflower, 2 large Eggplant, a head of Garlic, a bunch of Kale, 2 pounds of Onions, 2 sweet green Peppers, 1 large Winter Squash, 2 pounds of heirloom Tomatoes, and a combination of Beans, a bunch of Carrots, Okra, a bunch of Parsley, or a bunch of  Turnips.

Small baskets contained 1 Eggplant, 1 Garlic, 1 pack of Mushrooms, 1 Melon, 1/2 pound of Salad mix, 2 pounds of Onions, 1 sweet green Pepper, 1 Winter Squash, 1 pound of heirloom Tomatoes, and a combination of a bunch of Basil, a head of Cauliflower, a bunch of Kale, a bunch of Parsley, or a bunch of Turnips.

Week 14 – a glitch, there are no records for this week.

Week 15 –

Large baskets contained 1 pound of Beans, 1 large Eggplant, a head of Garlic, a bunch of Kale, a head of Lettuce, a pack of Mushrooms, 1 pound of Onions, several Summer Squashes, and 1 pound of Sweet Potatoes.

Small baskets contained 1 pound of Beans, a head of Lettuce, a bunch of Kale, a head of Garlic, a pack of Mushrooms, and several Summer Squash.

Week 16 –

Large baskets contained 1 pound of Salad mix, 1 sweet green Pepper, and a combination of a head of Cauliflower, 1 large Eggplant, a bunch of Kale, a pack of  Mushrooms, 1 pound of Onions, a bunch of Parsley, hot Peppers, Winter Squash, Summer Squash, 1 pound of heirloom Tomatoes, 1 pound of Cherry Tomatoes.

Small baskets contained 1/2 pound of Salad mix, 1 pound of Onions, 1 sweet green Pepper, 1 Winter Squash, and a combination of 1 pack of Mushrooms, 1 Eggplant, a bunch of Parsely, 1 pound of heirloom Tomatoes, or Summer Squash.

Week 17 – Thanksgiving

Large baskets contained 1 pound of Beans, 2 pounds of Brussel Sprouts, a head of Lettuce, a pack of Mushrooms, several Summer Squash, 1 sweet green Pepper, and 2 pounds of Potatoes.

Small baskets contained 1 pound of Beans, 1 pound of Brussel Sprouts, a pack of Mushrooms, several Summer Squash, 1 sweet green Pepper, and 1 pound of Potatoes.

Week 18 – (day and time changed for Windsor members)

Large baskets contained 1/2 pound of Beans, 3/4 pound of Brussel Sprouts, a bunch of Kale, a head of Lettuce, 2 sweet green Peppers, 1 pound of Potatoes, 1 pound of Sweet Potatoes, Summer Squash, and an extra-large bunch of Turnips.

Small baskets contained 1/4 pound of Beans, 1/2 pound of Brussel Sprouts, a bunch of Kale, a head of Lettuce, 1 sweet green Pepper, 1 pound of Sweet Potatoes, and a bunch of Turnips.

Week 19 –

Large baskets contained 1 pound of Salad mix, 1 Kohlrabi (green or purple), a bunch of Spring Onions, a bunch of Parsley, several Summer Squash, 1 pound of Pea Sprouts, 2 Daikon Radish, and 1 large Winter Squash.

Small baskets contained 1 Kohlrabi (green or purple), 1 pound of Salad mix, a bunch of Parsley, 1 pound of Pea Shoots, 1 Daikon Radish, and 1 small Winter Squash.

Week 20 –

Large baskets contained 1 stalk of Brussel Sprouts, a large bunch of Carrots, 2 heads of Garlic, a bunch of Kale, 1 pound of Salad mix, a bunch of Radishes, a bunch of Turnips, and a pound of Sunchokes.

Small baskets contained 1 stalk of Brussel Sprouts, a bunch of Carrots, 1 head of Garlic, a bunch of Kale, a bunch of Radishes, a small bunch of Turnips, and a pound of Sunchokes.

Leafy Greens baskets contained a weekly variety, valued between $10-$12 a week, of the following greens: Collards, Kale, Chard, Salad Mix, heads of Lettuce, Basil, Parsley, Cilantro, Rapini, Turnip Greens, and Radishes (yes, we know this is not a green, most of our Leafy Green member wanted to be part of our regular shares and we tried to give them special treats to show we appreciated them).

In addition we sold several Tomato Canning Shares, with 100 pounds, or 4 hampers, included in each, and Winter Storage Shares***, which included 3 pounds of Brussel Sprouts, 10 pounds of Onions, 20 pounds of Potatoes, 5 pounds of Sweet Potatoes, 4 large Butternut Squash, 2 bunches of Turnips, 10 heads of Garlic, 2 extra-large Hubbard Squash, 2 pounds of Sunchokes.

*Beans are a mix of Yellow, Green, Purple, Dragon, Tongue of Fire, and Blujay, all fresh eating Beans

**Mushrooms are certified organic and grown locally by Highline Mushrooms

***Due to devastating crop losses we had to buy most of the produce in the Winter shares

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