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Archive for October, 2013

It is our intention to build a grassroots community around Locally Germinated and to be more transparent, inclusive, and collaborative. We will be looking for more farmer partners and we will be holding meetings for new members and returning members in order to build a CSA that reflects the needs and wants of the community and members. We will also be putting out a “wish list” of materials needed to get our raised beds up and running.

Our focus will be more on Permaculture methods – working with nature and using low-tech ways to produce food – and creating a learning centre. More information about this to come.

Sneak peak: We will be starting a referral program for 2014. Any returning paid member who refers a new paid member will be put in to a draw to win an organically raised pastured chicken (value $35). You will get a chance to win for every new paid member referred.

We’re looking forward to working with, and for, you!

The business isn't the only thing that is moving lately!

The business isn’t the only thing that is moving lately!

Everyone helps out.

Everyone helps out.

Checkin' it out.

Checkin’ it out.

Nestled.  An old shed in a new place becomes the tool shed for the gardens.

Nestled.
An old shed in a new place becomes the tool shed for the gardens.

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Sunchokes, formerly known as Jerusalem Artichokes, are a native wildflower with an edible tuber similar to a potato (also known as Canada potato!).

In Bloom

In Bloom

Edible Tubers

Edible Tubers

A note on eating them for the first time from the book The Mini Farming Guide To Vegetable Farming: self-sufficiency from Asparagus to Zucchini by Brett L. Markham: “Sunchokes are an indigenous root vegetable that is high in an indigestible starch called inulin. You’ll find special pastas for diabetics made using inulin in some stores.

If you have never eaten them before, just eat a little bit the first few times because your large intestine likely lacks sufficient numbers of the bacteria needed to process inulin. This lack of bacteria will cause diarrhea. If you eat a little at a time and build up to it, you’ll soon find that you can pack away a whole plate of these delicious roots without any trouble at all.”

You can eat them any way you eat potatoes – roasted, fried, or in soups. They are also tasty raw. Experiment! If properly kept they will last until the Spring.

This website has a large variety of recipes to get you started – http://homecooking.about.com/library/archive/blv71.htm

You can also try planting a tuber a two for a very quick growing large flower that can withstand everything this climate has to throw at it.

Red variety of Sunchokes

Red variety of Sunchokes

We easily harvested 2 buckets of Sunchokes in 15 minutes from a small area. This red variety was taking over a new Pawpaw Tree.

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